Homegrown 8 Recap

Photo: Cal Quinn

Photo: Cal Quinn

Putting on a music festival of only local to regional artists, while trying to compete with other festivals unbound by that restriction, is a formidable task. Yet Homegrown Fest, now in its 8th year, not only brought in acts from outside of Texas, but resurrected Dallas’ late Tripping Daisy as its headliner.

At first glance, the lineup for Homegrown Fest may have seemed underwhelming, especially to a younger Dallas audience unfamiliar with the legacy of Tripping Daisy. While you could usually see many of the local bands for a fraction of the cost, and do so without having to burn through a bottle of suntan lotion, Homegrown Fest still figured out how to curate a full day of undeniable talent worth attending.

Photo: Cal Quinn

A few of these local bands put on a better performance than we’ve seen from them in years. White Denim being a perfect example; even with a new drummer, their performance was fire right out of the gates. Baltimore band, Lower Dens, played only as a two piece (guitar and drums), yet their dense sound needed no other instrumentation. NYC's Porches’ lead vocalist, Aaron Maine, endeared patrons with jokes about his straw hat bought earlier in the day from 7-Eleven in a whimsical attempt to show some Texas flair. Small in stature, they brought a huge performance with live versions of their songs having unexpected dynamic changes. London’s Still Corners found their equipment malfunctioning in the heat of the Texas sun, extending their soundcheck far into their set and threatening to put the festival off schedule. However, the band endured and Homegrown’s seasoned stage managers brought things right back on track.   

The sound was solid by any festival standards with only a few minor hiccups corrected before most noticed. Once the sun set, Homegrown showcased their light show, fittingly, for Tripping Daisy who was known years ago for their psychedelic lighting spectacles. Fast forward years later to updated lighting technology and you have a visual experience worthy of the nostalgia. Tripping Daisy’s set began with a curtain veiling stage with memories projected onto it dropping to reveal the band. Tim Delaughter ran from the stage across a ramp over the photo pit to the crowd jumping and shouting every word mirrored by their inexorably loyal fans.

To see more photos from Homegrown Fest check out our slideshow below.